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What are the consequences of felony drug possession in Florida?

On Behalf of | Jun 14, 2024 | CRIMINAL LAW - Felonies

While many states have recently legalized the use of marijuana, there are still several other drugs that are still considered to be illegal. If you have been charged with the possession and/or distribution of unlawful substances, you may face serious penalties under the law.

In Florida, illegal substances are generally classified as Schedule I, Schedule II, Schedule III, Schedule IV, or Schedule V based on how likely it is that a person will abuse the substance. If you are charged with possession of a Schedule V substance, such as cough suppressant, your consequences will typically be less severe than someone charged with possession of a Schedule V substance such as heroin.

If you are facing felony drug possession charges in Florida, the severity of the consequences you may face upon conviction will depend on several factors such as:

  • The type of substances you possessed/distributed
  • The quantity of the substances you possessed/distributed
  • Prior criminal history
  • Whether you had an intent to distribute
  • Circumstances surrounding the incident that led to your arrest (e.g., whether you had an illegal weapon in your possession)

If you are convicted of a felony in Florida, you could face prison time, and be required to pay a fine. Typically:

  • First-degree felonies may result in up to 30 years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines.
  • Second-degree felonies may result in up to 15 years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines.
  • Third-degree felonies may result in up to five years in prison and up to $5,000 in fines.

Establishing a defense against your drug charges is the best way to avoid conviction or have your sentence reduced.